Tag Archive: diabetes

  1. Rising prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in pre-diabetes patients

    Leave a Comment

    Kirthi et al. just published a much needed systematic review looking at the rise of peripheral neuropathy in pre-diabetes patients. Not surprisingly, they noted a higher than expected prevalence of neuropathy in this patient population. Interestingly, abnormal small nerve fiber parameters were most notable in this group. This finding aligns with the current consensus that small fiber precedes large fiber degeneration in diabetes. They conclude, “Given the marked rise in pre-diabetes, further consideration of targeting screening in this population is required. Development of risk-stratification tools may facilitate earlier interventions.”

     

  2. New Study Finds Younger Patients with Diabetes Experiencing Increased Hospitalization due to Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Leave a Comment

    Hamilton et al. just published an article in Diabetes Care highlighting a disturbing trend previously discussed in this blog. In their comprehensive study spanning 24 years, Hamilton et al. compared the incidence of hospitalization in two temporally-distinct cohorts of patients with diabetes with and without diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs).  They found the overall incidence of DFU hospitalizations was increased over time. Just as concerning, this incidence was increased in younger patients in the more recent group. This mirrors findings by Geiss et al. who demonstrated a resurgence of Lower Extremity Amputations (LEAs) in middle-aged and younger adults with diabetes. Additionally, this trend toward younger patients experiencing DFUs was noted in a pending publication by Dr. O’Brien evaluating the combined value of the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament and the ETF128 in predicting DFUs. Overall, movement toward earlier diabetes diagnosis with its attendant complications appears to be emerging. Some speculation has tied this tendency to behavioral and lifestyle choices made by younger patients, thus highlighting the need for improved patient education and compliance with preventative care recommendations.

  3. Enhanced glucose control improves vibration perception thresholds in type 1 diabetes patients

    Leave a Comment

    Nice study by Dahlin et al. out of Sweden showed improved glucose control as measured by Hb A1c levels led to improved vibration perception threshold (VPT) in Type I diabetes patients. This is yet another paper implying improvement in neurological function is possible in those patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This goes against long held dogma that DPN is largely irreversible. Interestingly, one of the more sensitive frequencies used in Dahlin’s study was 64 Hz, one of the frequencies available in our ETFMx.

     

  4. ETF Proof-of-Concept Study Cited in Two International Practice Guideline Documents

    Leave a Comment

    Although the International Federation of Diabetes (IDF) put out these clinical practice guidelines in 2017, we were gratified to see our 2014 ETF Proof-of-Concept study cited on page 19 of the document. We are cited in the section on using a 128 Hz tuning fork to assess diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    We were equally excited to learn that this same article was cited in a more recent article in the European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery in July 2019. We were cited in Global Vascular Guidelines on the Management of Chronic Limb-Threatening Ischemia”.  This clinical practice guideline document cites us on page S31 discussing clinical testing for neuropathy. 

     

  5. New Study Recommends ETF as Best Choice in Vibration Testing for Diabetic Patients

    Leave a Comment

    We are excited to report the results of recently published research article utilizing the ETF. This study by Raymond et al. from the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology has recommended the ETF as the best choice of vibration testing instruments to pair with Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing when performing lower extremity sensation testing in diabetic patients.  This study protocol compared the ETF to the traditional 128 Hz tuning fork and biothesiometer in terms of ease of use, testing time and standardization of vibration output. The authors recommended the ETF over the other devices. We welcome the results of this study and look forward to more research papers validating the clinical use of the ETF.