Tag Archive: diabetic peripheral neuropathy

  1. New Study Finds Vibration Testing More Reliable than Monofilament over Plantar Calluses

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    Wynands et al’s recently published “Does plantar skin abrasion affect cutaneous mechanosensation?” brings into focus the importance of plantar callus debridement.  This study measured skin thickness, hardness, monofilament threshold and vibration perception threshold (VPT) in healthy participants over plantar calluses before and after “abrasion” (debridement). The intervention group was compared to a matched control group without callus debridement. Findings included significantly reduced skin thickness and hardness as to be expected after callus debridement. Interestingly, VPTs at 30Hz and 200Hz were not significantly affected by debridement. Monofilament thresholds however were significantly improved after the intervention. This finding led the authors to conclude:

    “Since VPTs are not affected by skin properties, they are likely to be the best choice to analyze sensory deterioration in diabetic feet, where skin property changes could skew data of devices like monofilaments.”

    This recommendation aligns with American Diabetes Association Guidelines for using vibration(large-fiber function) and pinprick/temperature (small-fiber function) testing along with the 10g monofilament when testing for loss of protective sensation (LOPS) in patients with diabetes. Another conclusion drawn from this study is that callus debridement improves light touch perception in healthy study participants. Future studies might evaluate this intervention in patients with varying degrees of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Perhaps in addition to reducing pressures on the skin, debridement also will be found to improve skin sensitivity in this at risk group. 

  2. ETF128 selected for vibration testing in Benfotiamine clinical trials

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    The company was please to learn that the ETF128 will be one of the vibration testing methods utilized in an international clinical trial assessing the effects of benfotiamine on patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study will compare  benfotiamine 300 mg twice per day to placebo over 12 months. Vibration testing with the ETF will be one of several nerve function tests measuring secondary endpoints. We are looking forward to the outcomes of this well-designed study as benfotiamine is one of the most promising supplements on the horizon for patients with DPN.

  3. Rising prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in pre-diabetes patients

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    Kirthi et al. just published a much needed systematic review looking at the rise of peripheral neuropathy in pre-diabetes patients. Not surprisingly, they noted a higher than expected prevalence of neuropathy in this patient population. Interestingly, abnormal small nerve fiber parameters were most notable in this group. This finding aligns with the current consensus that small fiber precedes large fiber degeneration in diabetes. They conclude, “Given the marked rise in pre-diabetes, further consideration of targeting screening in this population is required. Development of risk-stratification tools may facilitate earlier interventions.”

     

  4. Enhanced glucose control improves vibration perception thresholds in type 1 diabetes patients

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    Nice study by Dahlin et al. out of Sweden showed improved glucose control as measured by Hb A1c levels led to improved vibration perception threshold (VPT) in Type I diabetes patients. This is yet another paper implying improvement in neurological function is possible in those patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This goes against long held dogma that DPN is largely irreversible. Interestingly, one of the more sensitive frequencies used in Dahlin’s study was 64 Hz, one of the frequencies available in our ETFMx.

     

  5. ETF Proof-of-Concept Study Cited in Two International Practice Guideline Documents

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    Although the International Federation of Diabetes (IDF) put out these clinical practice guidelines in 2017, we were gratified to see our 2014 ETF Proof-of-Concept study cited on page 19 of the document. We are cited in the section on using a 128 Hz tuning fork to assess diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    We were equally excited to learn that this same article was cited in a more recent article in the European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery in July 2019. We were cited in Global Vascular Guidelines on the Management of Chronic Limb-Threatening Ischemia”.  This clinical practice guideline document cites us on page S31 discussing clinical testing for neuropathy.